South Pittsburgh Reporter - Serving South Pittsburgh Since 1939

 
 

By Margaret L. Smykla
Contributing Writer 

Slopes residents learn more about permit parking process

 


An informational presentation on residential permit parking headlined the April 8 meeting of the South Sides Slopes Neighborhood Association (SSSNA).

It was conducted by Pittsburgh City Planning’s neighborhood planner, Ashley Holloway.

He said the program is resident-driven. Its main purpose is to keep all-day commuters from parking on residential streets.

The process for starting a permit parking area begins with a door-to-door petition drive by residents.

At least 70 percent of the households in a proposed district must sign the petition to proceed, as well as 70 percent of the households on each block in the proposed district. At least five blocks which share an edge or boundary are required.

Under the program, individuals who own cars with permits are permitted to park anywhere in the program area all day and night except for local restrictions like street cleaning. A permit costs $20 per program year per vehicle.

Up to three unrelated people in a residence may buy a permit.

A visitor’s pass costs $1 per program year per household, and is for a visitor within the program area.

Each household receives a maximum of one visitor’s pass. Those without a permit may park for only a limited amount of time, which may be no longer than a two-hour period as determined by residents.

Residents within the area choose the enforcement hours and days. Enforcement is by the Public Parking Authority of Pittsburgh using hand-held computers.

There is no parking enforcement on holidays.

There are currently 33 permit parking areas in the city. Mr. Holloway expects 38 by year’s end.

Attendees commented the problem on the Slopes is not commuters, but rather non-enforcement by the city of its occupancy laws.

Mr. Holloway said to contact him with over-occupancy sites, and he will alert the Bureau of Building Inspection (BBI).

At the conclusion of his presentation, he told attendees to see him if they are interested in starting a petition drive in their neighborhood. They then have 90 days to get back to him with a signed petition.

For more information, contact Mr. Holloway at ashley.holloway@pittsburghpa.gov.

In brief presentations, information on two projects of ReClaim South were presented by two GTECH Reclaim South ambassadors.

ReClaim South addresses vacancies in the Hilltop neighborhood through education, training, and the implementation of green strategies.

The first project was Cara Jette’s “Knoxville Incline Overlook.”

From 1890 to 1960, the Knoxville incline served as a connector that ascended adjacent to the current Brosville St. In 2011, a mural was added by the Allentown CDC at the intersection of Brosville St. and E. Warrington Ave. to commemorate its history.

Ms. Jette’s proposal is to create a friendly trail entrance on Brosville St .; make an attractive greenspace; and add signage.

She has received a $3,000 grant from GTECH; the Allentown CDC donated trees; and she is seeking permission for the project from the city. She will ask for volunteers for trail building/planting this summer.

Another ambassador, Dave Totten, discussed “Reclaim Library,” his project to place Little Free Libraries at four Hilltop bus stops.

The nonprofit Little Free Library is a worldwide community movement that offers free, donated books housed in compact receptacles.

Anyone who takes a book is under no obligation to return it, or provide a replacement. There are no due dates or fines.

His project outcomes are: reading is fun; enhance the community; and draw neighborhoods closer to transit.

Besides establishing little libraries at sites in Knoxville, Beltzhoover, and Arlington, he plans to place one at Barry and Josephine streets in the Slopes. He is looking for a fifth site.

Next, there was information on the private social network, nextdoor.com, for neighborhoods. The network can be used among neighbors to organize crime watches, find a babysitter, ask for help in watching for a lost dog, and more.

Only Slopes residents will have access to the Slopes group. Those who own a business in the Slopes must verify its address to acquire access.

Hillary Bundy of Rebuilding Together Pittsburgh was the next speaker and said the organization’s focus is providing free home repair assistance to low-income seniors, veterans, and the disabled.

Applicants must own their homes for at least three years, and be current on all taxes. The household must meet income requirements to qualify.

Rebuilding Together Pittsburgh is part of a national network, and is also a local non-profit with 501(c)(3) status.

It is seeking new applications from Slopes’ homes. To request an application, or for more information, call 412-922-0953.

The final presentation was by Nancy Schaefer of the Student Conservation Association (SCA).

The SCA is a national and environmental nonprofit organization founded in 1957. Its mission is to build the next generation of conservation leaders and inspire stewardship of our communities by engaging young people in hands-on service.

The youths work Saturdays on trails, signage, clean-up, and more under the supervision of trained, experienced crew leaders. Those who work in South Side Park receive minimum wage.

Volunteers are being sought for Earth Day in South Side Park on April 26.

Youngsters should contact her if interested in summer and other work. Adults are also needed to lead the youth this summer.

In Slopes news, upcoming important dates include: neighborhood clean-up on April 19; Earth Day in South Side Park, 10 a.m.--2 p.m ., on April 26; neighborhood clean-up on May 10; and National Trails Day at South Side Park on June 7.

The SSSNA will host a Meet the Candidates Night on April 15 at 7 p.m. in the main lounge of the St. Paul of the Cross Retreat Center. State Reps. Harry Readshaw and Erin Molchany, who are running for the Democratic nomination in the newly reorganized 36th legislative district, will debate.

 

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