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Pittsburgh adopts plan for open space, parks and recreation

 


Mayor Luke Ravenstahl has announced the city’s final adoption of OPENSPACEPGH - the open space, parks and recreation plan that will guide the development of Pittsburgh’s open spaces and help leaders determine how to better invest in parks, recreation facilities and vacant land reclamation projects.

OPENSPACEPGH is part of PLANPGH, the city’s 12-component, 25-year comprehensive plan, projected to be completed in 2016.

“Residents’ willingness to share their concerns and desires for the open spaces they hold dear to them was critical to shaping the recommendations of OPENSPACEPGH,” said Mayor Ravenstahl. “Now that it is adopted, we can work with them to make the changes necessary to continue to enhance our open spaces and improve our city’s quality of life.”

OPENSPACEPGH recommendations were developed with input from nearly 3,000 residents, interviews with experts in the field, best practice models, and analysis of the city’s parks, hillsides, vacant properties and other open spaces. The recommendations are centered around five central goals:

to Transition the open space system into one that meets the needs and desires of the city and its residents

to Integrate natural systems into the open space system and urban fabric of the city

to Activate people and places

to sustainably Steward the system with the resources of the city and its partners

to Document the open space system to better make data-driven decisions and accurately report progress to city residents

OpenSpacePGH is the second PLANPGH component to be adopted, following PRESERVEPGH, the city’s cultural heritage plan. MOVEPGH, ARTPGH and DESIGNPGH, the city’s transportation and public art/urban design plans, are currently in the draft development stage. Once completed, these components will be integrated into a multi-purpose policy document that will set investment priorities, coordinate neighborhood-scale planning efforts and guide the city’s land use and development decision-making processes for many years to come.

 

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