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Emerald Trail Corps into second year of job training

 

May 22, 2012



The Emerald Trail Corps launched its second season of job training programming and ecological improvements in Emerald View Park at the end of April.

A project of the Mount Washington Community Development Corporation and its partners at GTECH Strategies, the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Labor-Management Clearinghouse, and Student Conservation Association, Emerald Trail Corps provides underserved adults with a variety of life histories new green job skills, quality work experience, a hard earned wage and medical benefits.

The 2012 Emerald Trail Corps consists of two crew leaders and seven crew members who are graduates of the A. Phillip Randolph Institute. During their time on the crew, members will receive a variety of soft and hard skill trainings like proper tool usage, basic trail design and construction, tree identification, planting and care, soil identification and erosion prevention, invasive plant management, CPR and first aid safety.

In addition, they will be working with GTECH Strategies to learn about employment opportunities in the green job field and the Labor-Management Clearinghouse on achieving full, permanent employment. A second crew is anticipated to be added in June 2012. People interested in being employed by the Emerald Trail Corps should contact the A. Phillip Randolph Institute's Breaking the Chains of Poverty program to see if they qualify.

"The Emerald Trail Corps represents a significant opportunity for underrepresented individuals to take a step towards a life time career in green jobs while building their confidence and competence for permanent employment. Simultaneously, they are creating a magnificent asset for the people of Pittsburgh," said Ilyssa Manspeizer, director of park development and conservation at the Mount Washington CDC.

"Last year's Emerald Trail Corps built the Park's first new mile of trail across difficult and challenging topography and removed 80,000 pounds of rubble from Mount Washington's slopes. We expect this year's crew to accomplish even more."

 

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